Meet Our Board

Morgan Walsh, Founder
Morgan is an actor, writer, entrepreneur and mother of three living in Los Angeles. She has worked in film and television for over 20 years, most recently starring in BET’s Games People Play. She is the co-founder of 10th Avenue Tea, which in 2017 was awarded Most Innovative Product by Expo West. The idea for Gender Nation emerged in 2014, as Morgan connected with parents supporting LGBTQ+ youth in her community. She believes – and the evidence shows – that exposure to inclusive and uplifting stories helps kids feel more seen and heard, minimizing bullying and fostering a better learning environment.

Keiko Feldman, Co-Founder
Keiko is an Emmy award-winning producer who brings extensive experience in investigative, in-depth storytelling from NBC News to Juris Productions. After being introduced to Gender Nation through Morgan, she immediately connected with the organization’s mission and simple, effective programming, joining Morgan in building connections with schools and school districts and making the organization’s book drops.

Jon Brockett is the supervising producer of the Screen Actors Guild Awards and National Director for SAG-AFTRA’s Programming Department. As a child growing up gay in the South – and in the closet – books served as an escape for Jon, who feels LGBTQ+ representation in storytelling has the power to make kids feel less alone.

Katya Lidsky Friedman is a writer, animal advocate, and recovering actress. She has written three novels, countless essays, and wrote and performed an acclaimed one-woman play. As a lover of family and books, she believes in the power of seeing oneself on the page, reflected back, whispering, you are not alone.

Matt Walsh is a two-time Emmy-nominated actor and a founding member of the famed national improv-sketch comedy theatre Upright Citizens Brigade. He believes gender creative heroes are good for children of all stripes, proving anyone has the ability to be a hero.

Nicole Weissman is a nonprofit communications strategist based in Washington, D.C. She believes books – especially books in libraries, where so many people can access them – have ripple effects not only for the people who read them, but for their broader communities.